Breakfast on the Deccan Queen

While much has changed for the worse, some things have definitely changed for the better, in the last five years, in India. One of the changes I am really grateful for is to be able to book train tickets online.

Hallelujah!!

Does anyone recall ye olde days of yore at the railway station, standing in a queue for 4 hours to reach the head of the line only to be told “Sold out” or “Waiting list only” or only available for the next day and other such disappointing stuff. We knew full well that half the tickets had been “reserved” to be sold in the black market later that day.

Being a frequent PUNE-BOMBAY traveler this was my weekly plight. My fate was to be jammed in with a hundred other women for “floor only” seating in the unreserved ladies compartment, time after time.

Eleven years ago all that changed. IRCTC online happened and there has been no looking back. Oh the pleasure of booking a ticket from the comfort of home rather than being inspected with infinite interest from top to toe, for an interminable four hours by bored and curious fellow queue’ ers in the grubby and smelly environs of the booking office !!

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Though trips are less and less frequent, I still make the odd journey on the Deccan Queen (now rather battered by age) with its tattered blue rexine covered seats and less than spacious chairs.

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However one wonderful tradition has not changed.  The menu of breakfast made fresh in the pantry car......

Omelette sandwich, Cutlet sandwich, Sabudana wadas , hot chai and coffee. All dripping with oil and deliciously sinful, served with “tomato” (read pumpkin) sauce.

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The waiters have a great memory, taking the order before Lonavala and coming round a couple of hours later (around Panvel), to settle the bill without aid of pen and paper.

Today the price of the breakfast snack is significantly more than the original 35 paise but worth its oily weight in gold.

When you crave the fine pleasure of spacing out on train journeys and eating gloriously unhealthy stuff, or are bitten by the nostagia for the delights of chair car travel and railway food- you can whip up the following.

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 Omelette Sandwich Deccan Queen Style

Ingredients

2 tablepoons vegetable oil or butter

2 eggs, beaten

½ onion, finely minced

/1 green chilli, finely minced

½ tomato chopped fine

¼ teaspoon salt

2 large slices white bread

Method

1. Heat the oil and a frying pan. When hot fry the onions and chillies. When soft add the tomatoes and sauté.

2. Pour in beaten eggs and fry till set. Fold into half and then fold again into a quarter

3. Butter two slices of bread. Put the quartered omelette in between .

4. Serve hot with plenty of tomato sauce and a paper napkin to wipe a shining face later.


Ingredients in Konkani Cooking

As I reach the completion of  my book on Konkani Cooking I have had fun finding out more about all the more  unusual ingredients used in this cuisine. Right now I have mentioned most of the scientific names and some common names of these ingredients ( also in 10 languages in the glossary of the book) but I'd be grateful for any other insights readers may have about the following:

Spices primarily used :

  1. Black pepper
  2. Fenugreek
  3. Red chillies   For example a.Byadgi b. Birds eye, c. Kashmiri chillies 
  4. Asafetida 
  5. Turmeric
  6. Mustard seed
  7. Cumin

Secondary Spices used:

1.Teppal, Tirphal, trephal, Sichuan pepper

2. Coriander

3. Khus Khus

4.Cloves

5.Cinnamon

6.Bay leaf/ Tej patta (different from Cassia leaf/bay leaf in the west)

7. Cardamon Black and green

 

 

B.Herbs

Green coriander

Green Mango

Curry leaf

Mango Ginger/ aamhaldi

Ginger

Garlic

C. Souring agents used in Konkani food for example

1.Bilimbi fruit of the Avarrhoa Bilimbi tree , also known as cucumber tree or tree sorrel. bilimbi,Irumban Puli,Chemmeen Puli,Bimbul, Orkkaapuli.A very acid fruit sometimes eaten raw as a relish. Mostly dried in salt and used as a souring agent in Konkani food.

2.Carambola/ Karmbal   also known as starfruit is the fruit of the Carmabola Avarhhoa tree,

3 Tamarind

4.Kokum

5.Mango pith

 

D.Vegetables, fruit and flowers  used in Konkani Cuisine

Coconut- Coconut tree. Called Kalpavriksh in Konkani cooking 

Gourds- ash gourd*, snake gourd, bitter gourd, teasel gourd, Ridge gourd, Bottle gourd, *

Malabar Cucumber , Magge

Chayote, Chow chow

Yam, kook, Chinese potato, Wild potato

Sweet potato

Banana, flower, pith and fruit

Drumstick , flower and leaves and fruit

Colocasia, leaves and corms

Breadfruit, /Neer phanas

Hog Plums/ Ambada

Wood apple ( note this is not Bel Phal)

Tender cashewnuts,

Jackfruit, fruit and seeds

Pumpkin, flowers and fruit

Gooseberries /Amla

Karmbal /Star fruit

Gulla or Matti Gulla ( green aubergine)

Greens- Brahmi leaves/Ekpani/Gotu Kola

              Venti

              Vaali

             Thotakoora

             Malabar Spinach

Tender Bamboo shoots

 

E.Lentils /peas

Cow peas

Horse Gram/ Kulith/

Besides, Green gram, Black gram, Pigeon Peas and Red lentils 

F.Fish

Common fish used in Konkani cooking- For example

Lady fish

Shark Ambotik

Rock fish

Do write in with any other local names of ingredients in order to help identify it for other users and also any personal or unusual way in which you clean, cut or cook any of the uncommon ones.

Thanks!


Gluten free grains and flours in India

More and more people the world over suffer from some kind of gluten intolerance. It is worth listing the large variety of gluten free grains and foods available so abundantly in India .

Widely used during fasts, these grains are becoming a regular source of nutrients often substituting for wheat in the daily diet.

Gluten free grains and flours in India with local names

- Rice (all forms, even glutinous),( chawal , tandul) Common Indian foods with rice - khichadi, biryani, dosa, idli, NOT RAwa Idli,

- Corn/maize, Makka, flour made with corn  Makki ka atta

- Potato, Alu

- Soy

- Tapioca/cassava, Ratalu

- Arrowroot, Araru, Araruta

- Sago – Sabudana, Indian food sabudana khichadi and vada

- Lentil/pea (besan, urid, gram flour) Besan pancakes, chila, pakodas made in besan batter

- Amaranth- Rajgira,  Amaranth flour- Rajgira atta,

- Sorghum- Jowar, Sorghum flour- Jowar Atta

- Millet – Millet Flour ( bajri)

-Foxtail Millet, ( Kangni, Korra)

-Pearl millet, (Bajra)

- Finger Millet, ( Mandua, Ragi or Nachni),

-Kodo Millet, (Kodra, Varagu)

-Little MIllet, (KutkiSamai)

-Proso Millet ( Barri, Varigulu,Baragu

- Barnyard Millet ( Jhangora,Baghar , Vari cha tandul)


Auchan not so chaan

Auchan
It took me some time to begin shopping for groceries at supermarket chains. I felt disloyal to my neighbourhood general stores where my rupee contributed to the preservation of "small business".

In the face of horrifying parking issues in Pune ( where not one building has adhered to parking laws, and has sold or rented parking spaces to house yet more shops, so customers are forced to park on the road,  creating more jams, obstructions and stress) I have been forced to frequent the self help supermarkets proliferating all over Pune.. 

It has not all been  under protest though. The parking lots are the main attraction. No major warfare  at the time of parking. Trolleys to save the weight on my arms, airconditioning and choice.All this makes it an option today.The time saved, alone, makes it worthwhile. 

In the beginning it seemed as if every supermarket catered to a foreign clientele- olive oil, pasta, mayonnaise , tinned , processed and unrecognisable foods filled the shelves. However I was glad to notice that one or two supermarkets had the average Indian customer in mind and offered, besides jowar and bajra grains and flour, more niche foods like dosa batter, idli batter and khowa, lassi and paneer.

And so I became a regular customer at Auchan (once known and soon to be known again as Max Hypermarket.)

Ah Woe is Me!!

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For the last month I have been going to the delicatessan counter to pick up the usual batter and have been met with an indifferent ...." Its finished or Just starting to grind, or I dont know , not available. " No explainations, no concern, no attempt to cater to the customer. Nobody had bothered to ensure that products which were advertised were actually stocked or available.

When attempting to make a complaint, there is no manager, no assistant manager, no customer care human available . Have they all gone to lunch at 12 oclock at the same time, or maybe congregating for an important meeting in the toilet?

Unless you stage a dharna and raise your voice no person in sight wants to come forward and take responsibility.

As in all these large companies when it comes to the crunch the customer just has to lump it because no one is hearing. It seems every food retail business in India is making money hand over fist and couldn't care one bit about the consumer....yes, us little people who make your tills ring.

It is no longer worth going out of my way to a supermarket to buy ALL my groceries on the promise of one or two items specific to them, when there is no guarantee that they will be available. For the rest what they stock is what my mom and pop store stocks. So its back to Panchali General store for me.

Bye Bye Auchan and Max

 

 

 


Nepali Aloo Achaar- A tangy, hot accompaniment

We love having guests over, especially the kind that enjoy food and even better, the ones that love cooking.

Right now we have Sipee , a bright and chatty Nepali girl stay with us.She treated us yesterday to a typical dish from Nepal, often served when entertaining. -Aloo Achaar.


This is meant to be eaten like a koshimbir, a tablepoon or two along with your main dish.
It looks to be a keeper...I can see us making this very often from now on.

Ingredients

1/2 kg baby potatoes
2 tablepoons sesame seeds, toasted
1 teaspoon cumin powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder
A pinch of turmeric
A generous pinch of red chilli powder
Juice of 1 lime or a teapoon of "Chuk" (Nepali black lime paste)
2-4 green chillies, sliced in the length ( add more according to taste)

2 teaspoon mustard oil
1/2 teaspoon fenugreek seeds

Method:

1.Boil the potatoes till done. Peel.
2.Grind the toasted sesame seeds into a powder and mix with the other spices.
3. Add this mixture to the cooked potatoes and stir well with the aid of a tablepoon or two of water.
4. Add the lime juice and mix again.
5. Set aside for 15 minutes.
6. Top with the sliced green chillies.
7. Heat the oil and fry the fenugreek seeds till they pop. Pour this seasoning over the potatoes and serve.

Its absolutely delicious.

PS No time to take a photo...we ate it all up instantly.!